Tech News

Orange unveils plans for French 5G roll-out

Almost exactly a year after first indicating its strategy for the roll-out of next-generation networks across its key European territories, Orange has revealed its plans for the roll-out of its 5G network in 15 French municipalities, with, it said, quality of service its priority.

Orange announced that as of 3 December 2020 it will roll out 5G in Nice, Marseille, Le Mans, Angers and Clermont Ferrand. By the end of the year, more than 160 municipalities will be covered with 5G.

On 1 October 2020, during the auction for 5G spectrum in France, Orange obtained the largest share of the frequency blocks involved, with 90 MHz of spectrum. The 5G deployment focuses mainly on these new 3.5GHz frequencies and may be supplemented by the use of 2.1GHz frequencies. Orange said that only 3.5GHz frequencies allow a true 5G experience with fast browsing, reduced latency and almost instantaneous download speeds.

The

Linius aims to add magic to video conferencing with Whizzard

Cloud-based solutions provider Linius Technologies has unveiled Whizzard, a new product for the video conferencing and enterprise collaboration markets.

Integrated with conferencing and enterprise collaboration technology such as Zoom, Webex Meetings and Microsoft Teams, Whizzard is designed to address two key markets – the corporate and enterprise market with Whizzard-meet, and the university and higher education market with Whizzard-learn.

Linius said it expects the video-conferencing market to achieve a compound annual growth rate of over 19% between 2020 and 2026. It pointed out that Zoom had announced earlier this year that it had more than 300 million participants a day and Microsoft Teams had reported up to 2.7 billion meeting minutes a day. It added that more than 183,000 educational institutions are now using Microsoft Teams, as are 91 of the Fortune 100 companies.

Linius said Whizzard will enable employers, employees, students and teachers to transform hours of video footage

Ericsson taps into industry momentum for network orchestration and automation

In what it describes as a “significant industry milestone”, Ericsson has revealed that it has passed the century mark for its orchestrator technology in the third quarter of 2020, securing 139 commercial orchestration deals with more than 100 global communications service providers.

The Ericsson Orchestrator is designed to enable automation of hybrid infrastructure, including PNFs and VNFs, in a multi-supplier environment. It supports resource orchestration, VNF lifecycle management and end-to-end service orchestration for both telecom and enterprise environments.

Ericsson said the key benefits of its orchestration offering include providing the capabilities that service providers need to operate their networks efficiently, increase agility, build new services quickly and future-proof their networks to stay ahead in the race to obtain 5G market share.

Orchestration is also a vital component for 5G network slicing, which is predicted to be a key revenue enabler in the 5G arena. A recent study from Juniper

Broadband access drives New Zealand remote working to be permanent fixture

Research by New Zealand telecommunications infrastructure provider Chorus has revealed that even though the country has been an exemplar in how to deal with a pandemic, Covid-19 has pushed New Zealanders to do more online – and the changes are sticking. 

The broadband behavioural survey, conducted by Venture Insights, an ANZ telco and media research and consulting company, was commissioned by Chorus in October 2020 as a follow-up to a previous survey conducted in April 2020. The aim of both surveys was to determine how Covid-19 has changed online behaviours and which of these behaviours are continuing as New Zealand comes out of lockdown. The survey covered broadband usage, working from home, telehealth usage and online shopping behaviour.

It found that remote working remained high over the months. Before the pandemic, 28% of respondents had worked from home and the April study revealed a significant increase in working from home

Vodafone, Ericsson trial automated flight paths for connected drones

Vodafone and Ericsson have successfully tested safe sky corridors for drones using intelligent aspects of the mobile network.

The development, described by the companies as a technological breakthrough, is designed to allow professional drone operators, critical national infrastructure providers and emergency services to deliver medical, commercial and industrial supplies, safe in the knowledge that they will arrive at the correct destination on time while remaining connected to the mobile network.

In a proof-of-concept trial conducted at Vodafone’s 5G Mobility Lab in Aldenhoven, Germany, the companies used intelligence from the network to produce coverage maps, which enabled the drone to stay in areas with a good signal up in the air. They also collated anonymised mobile user information so the drone could avoid crowded areas down on the ground and did this using information obtained via Vodafone’s Network Exposure Layer.

In practice, this works by Vodafone providing these two key

UK telecoms industry gives guarded welcome to Telecommunications Bill proposal

Just when anyone would be forgiven for thinking the furore had ended regarding the need for telcos to remove the technology belonging to so called “at-risk” suppliers from their 5G infrastructures, think again, as new UK government legislation to further reinforce this degree opens up new wounds.

The UK government’s Telecommunications (Security) Bill, to be introduced on 24 November, aims to give the government unprecedented new powers to, in its words, boost the security standards of the UK’s telecoms networks and remove the threat of high-risk suppliers, principally Huawei.

It is also said to provide a basis to strengthen the security framework for technology used in 5G and full-fibre networks, including the electronic equipment and software at phone mast sites and in telephone exchanges which handle internet traffic and telephone calls.

The background of the new legislation is the decision in July 2020 by the UK government to commit