Tech News

Widespread adoption of WBA OpenRoaming on the cards

Less than six months after the standard was first introduced, 79% of service providers, equipment manufacturers and enterprises have adopted or plan to adopt the WBA OpenRoaming standard, according to a cross-industry survey from Wireless Broadband Alliance (WBA), the worldwide industry body dedicated to improving Wi-Fi standards and services.

The finding is presented in the WBA annual industry report, which puts forward the case for WBA OpenRoaming based on the prediction that the world will become a single, giant Wi-Fi network, allowing billions of people and their devices to connect automatically and securely to millions of Wi-Fi networks around the world.

In this unified network, users will be able to roam from location to location without the need for logins, registrations or passwords. High-profile backers of WBA OpenRoaming include AT&T, Boingo, Broadcom, Cisco, Commscope, Google, Intel and Samsung.

The study revealed that as much as 95% of the comms

RCS forecast to deliver $52.2bn for mobile operators by 2028

Having long promised to enable operators and brands to increase subscriber engagement and create new revenue streams in an increasingly media-rich communications market, rich communications services (RCS) look set to make good on their promise and divert billions of dollars from digital banner advertising to mobile operator-led RCS campaigns over the coming years, according to the findings of a report by business messaging intelligence firm Mobilesquared.

The report, RCS: The game changer the industry has been waiting for, published in association with Out There Media, highlights the comparative potential return on investment achieved by RCS and current digital banner advertising.

The analyst calculates that for every $1m invested, just 0.1%, derives value for brands. By contrast, the report suggests that brands’ RCS spend will be worth more than $52.2bn by 2028, with mobile operators able to claim a significant portion of this revenue.

Moreover, it says that if brands

Huawei claims £3.3bn contribution to UK economy

In the latest part of its ongoing campaign to fight back against having to remove its communications solutions from UK infrastructure, Huawei has released the findings of a report from business analysts Oxford Economics.

According to the report, Huawei is responsible for a £3.3bn contribution to GDP and supports 51,000 jobs through its economic activity.

Hanging over the report is the decision in July 2020 by the UK government to commit to a timetable for the removal of Huawei equipment from the country’s growing 5G communications infrastructure by 2027 – effectively a huge U-turn to the decision it took only in January 2020 to restrict Huawei’s presence to just the radio access network element of 5G setups.

The call was made after the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) reviewed the consequences of the decision by the US on 15 May to extend its restrictions on the sale of hardware

Masergy goes deeper with SASE to strengthen SD-WAN security

Digital enterprise software-defined network and cloud platform provider Masergy has announced that it is strengthening its software-defined wide area network (SD-WAN) Secure products to offer secure access service edge (SASE) capabilities.

Masergy said a recent IDG study had found that 91% of companies are interested in SASE, which is no surprise given how Covid-19 has reshaped the business arena. Gartner coined the term secure access service edge in August 2019 when it published The future of network security is in the cloud, detailing how SASE is the natural evolution of two trends – network as a service and network security as a service.

SASE has begun to disrupt the networking and security markets. As incumbent suppliers make strategic moves to build SASE offerings, the nascent technology has the potential to upend traditional networking and security, especially now as IT departments have had to deal with vastly increased amounts

Ericsson claims strong momentum across Africa

As it reveals that it has racked up modernisation contracts with communications service providers (CSPs) in Cameroon, Tanzania and Congo to boost network performance and manage subscribers’ growing data demands, Ericsson believes that forward-thinking CSPs in Africa are already securing their role in a dynamic market thanks to advanced infrastructure technology.

The Swedish comms provider said that these latest deals and others reflect the rapid growth of mobile connectivity across the region, as consumer demand for enhanced mobile services continues to grow. Ericsson said that this not only shows that Africa is one of the fastest growing mobile markets, but it reiterates the need for a more efficient technology, higher data rates and availability of ample spectrum.

“Technology brings an unprecedented opportunity to address the challenges of sustainable economic development and improve the livelihood of people in Africa,” said Fadi Pharaon, president of Ericsson Middle East and Africa. “Mobile and

European IT budget share reflects home-working challenges brought by Covid

Businesses in Europe have cut their IT budgets in response to the Covid-19 pandemic and its ramifications, and have redirected the remainder to address challenges that home-working policies have forced upon them.

According to the latest, updated edition of the TechTarget/Computer Weekly IT Priorities 2020 survey, 33% of businesses in Europe have reduced the IT budget by more than 5%. At the same time, 55% of organisations said their budgets remained flat, and only 12% said their IT budgets had increased by more than 5%.

Most of the businesses questioned in the survey were from the UK, Germany and France, with about 20% made up of organisations in the rest of Europe.

The pandemic response has seen a major shake-up in where IT budgets are deployed, with remote-working projects, for example, much easier to justify than in the past. According to the survey, nearly half (46%) of organisations said spending